Page Index Toggle Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 8 Send TopicPrint
Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) Offseason Outlook: Pittsburgh Pirates (MLBTR) (Read 4067 times)
WildwoodDave 2
Elite Member
*****
Offline


OnlyBucs.net Member

Posts: 3828
Joined: Dec 17th, 2020
Re: Offseason Outlook: Pittsburgh Pirates (MLBTR)
Reply #30 - Oct 14th, 2022 at 7:47am
Print Post  
Possum wrote on Oct 13th, 2022 at 5:07pm:
Holy Crap!  I am down in the dumps because I miss the games we list in our Game Day Threads.

Especially things like the crazy batting orders that Shelty makes.  And then there is giving a guy rest in the middle of a hot streak.  Playing a utility guy at 1B who is too darn short.  Miss managing his bullpen by not letting the starters go an extra inning when they are on in a game. 
I also miss the funny gifs that Bobster posts and game day reports from the stadium by Surg.  Finally, there are the in-game and post-game reports where Robby asks soft questions to a player. 
I will miss the announcers like Brown and Walk who do no more in the booth than joke around and make themselves more entertainers than game callers and analysts. 
What am I going to do until February?  I don't give a rat's arse about the Stillers who are in similar circumstances as our Bucs.  Maybe the Pens will make the winter more entertaining until the 1st round of the playoffs.

There's always Pitt Football and Basketball Cheesy
Becky says that you can pay now more more attention to her  Cheesy Grin
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
3pirates3
Full Member
***
Offline



Posts: 190
Joined: Dec 30th, 2020
Re: Offseason Outlook: Pittsburgh Pirates (MLBTR)
Reply #31 - Oct 15th, 2022 at 10:56am
Print Post  
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Surgnbuck
Elite Member
*****
Offline


OnlyBucs.net Member

Posts: 7699
Location: Lower Burrell PA
Joined: Mar 4th, 2020
Re: Offseason Outlook: Pittsburgh Pirates (MLBTR)
Reply #32 - Oct 15th, 2022 at 1:09pm
Print Post  
Guesses on the 40 man decisions initially? Day after WS ends, FA's gain that designation. All guys on the 60 day IL have to come off that designation, and added to the 40 man.

Pirates sit at 45 right now. Not looking ahead quite yet to the Rule 5 protection date in November, the Pirates have to eliminate 5.

Some of them are easy. Gamel and Perez are free agents. They have 5 catchers, no doubt AT LEAST Godoy and Collins are dropped.

That leaves for certain one more spot to have to clear. I'm guessing it will be either another catcher (Heineman most likely) or one of the relief pitchers. Blake Cederlind has been on the 60 day IL forever it seems. I can see them cutting bait with him.

The most interesting guys could be Underwood Jr. (who I think will be non-tendered) and Robert Stephenson. Underwood is Arb 1, with a projected figure of 1 million. Stephenson is Arb 3, and his projection is 1.9 million. (both figures from MLB Trade rumors). What makes them interesting despite how cheap they are, is both are out of options. For Underwood, I think that spells doom for him.
  

"Service to others is the rent you pay for your time here on earth."  Muhammed Ali
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Possum
Forum Administrator
*****
Offline


Older Than Dirt!

Posts: 3447
Location: Possum Holler, Pa
Joined: Jun 8th, 2016
Re: Offseason Outlook: Pittsburgh Pirates (MLBTR)
Reply #33 - Oct 18th, 2022 at 7:30pm
Print Post  
  

It's A Great Day for Bucco Baseball

Possum
"nuckbobfutting"  😈
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Ecbucs
Elite Member
*****
Offline


OnlyBucs.net Member

Posts: 3913
Location: Alabama
Joined: Jun 30th, 2016
Re: Offseason Outlook: Pittsburgh Pirates (MLBTR)
Reply #34 - Oct 18th, 2022 at 9:12pm
Print Post  
Possum wrote on Oct 18th, 2022 at 7:30pm:


I didn't think Sulser would be back with Bucs.  Can see Sanchez being better than Goday.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
3pirates3
Full Member
***
Offline



Posts: 190
Joined: Dec 30th, 2020
Re: Offseason Outlook: Pittsburgh Pirates (MLBTR)
Reply #35 - Oct 19th, 2022 at 6:07am
Print Post  
MLBTR will be holding a Pirates offseason chat at 10 this morning.

https://www.jotcast.com/chat/pirates-offseason-chat-14166.html
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Bobster
Global Moderator
*****
Offline



Posts: 10516
Joined: Jun 10th, 2016
Re: Offseason Outlook: Pittsburgh Pirates (MLBTR)
Reply #36 - Oct 19th, 2022 at 8:50am
Print Post  
Possum wrote on Oct 18th, 2022 at 7:30pm:

Sanchez is out of options. But there's a good chance he could be DFA'd and clear waivers and go to AAA. I think BC expected Sulser to clear waivers last year and be returned to AAA. The Orioles claimed him but now BC got him back.
  

There is no Choi in Mudville.
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
MaineBucs
Elite Member
*****
Offline


OnlyBucs.net Member

Posts: 1038
Joined: Jun 30th, 2016
Re: Offseason Outlook: Pittsburgh Pirates (MLBTR)
Reply #37 - Oct 19th, 2022 at 2:31pm
Print Post  
Disgustingly, it appears that BC will again need to try and field a team with a payroll in the range of $55 mil, or about $35 mil less than when the team last made the play-offs, and this at a time when many major league payrolls and individual player salaries are surging.  I loath Nutting and his business model that knee caps the Pirates and ruins the dreams of life-long and young Pirate fans alike.   That said, I have chosen to remain a Pirate fan.  Recognizing the severe salary constraints confronting BC, I offer my thoughts on how he could allocate his limited resources in making improvements in 2023 and helping to jump start the team to further advancements (more wins) in 2024. 

First, some positives:

1) The Pirates (for the first time in a while as the Polanco contract is now off the books) have no bad long-term contracts.  Only Hayes and Reynolds are signed for next year, and Hayes is the only player signed beyond next season.  And, while Hayes' contract checks in at $10 mil next year, it is only $7 - $8 mil for the next 6 seasons.  At present, the Pirates have a total of $16.75 mil committed to next year's payroll between Hayes and Reynolds.

2) The Pirates are not facing any significant arbitration cases with respect to total salary.  Only 6 players are eligible for arbitration (Stephenson, Newman, Andujar, Underwood, Keller, and Brubaker), and the highest estimated arbitration salary is Newman at $2.8 mil.  And, as noted in the MLB Trade Rumors article, several of the above could be released, although releasing any of the above would not do a lot to boost available payroll to commit to other players.  As such, players that are released can be based on value to the team (read talent) rather than cost.  Few other teams are in a similar position.   

3)  Most players on the team are not eligible for arbitration as they have less than 3 years of service, thus they will earn between the league minimum and $800,000.  This likely will be the case for at least 12 and more likely up to 18 players on the team.  This likely will result in a total payroll commitment of about $18 mil.    

So, some moves I would pursue.

1)  Although it is not adding to the current roster, I believe the Bucs should offer 2 long-term contracts to current pitchers:

a) Based on this season's performance, I would offer Keller a 5 year deal to buy out his 3 years of arbitration eligibility and his first 2 years of free agency.  As he is scheduled to earn about $2.8 mil in arbitration, perhaps a 2023 boost to $4.5 mil, a 2024 salary in the range of $6.5 mil, a 2025 salary in the range of $8 mil, and 2 free agent years in the range of $10 or $12 mil could interest him.  The cost of talent is escalating rapidly, and if Keller is now the real deal (as he appears to be), now is the time to commit to him.   Keller is still only 26 years old.

b) The second pitcher would be Contreras.  As Surg noted, the Braves inked Strider to a 6 year - $75 million deal.  Contreras did not have anywhere near Strider's stats, but he has shown promise.  Strider's deal pays him little in the next 2 seasons $1 mil each year), increasing to $4 mil in 2025, but then jumps dramatically to $20 and $22 mil in its last 2 years.   I would suggest that the Bucs approach Contreras with a front-loaded deal.  Offer him 6 years with an option and pay him something like $45 - $50 mil over the life of the deal.  Perhaps $5 mil in 2023 and 2024 (meaning he would earn about $10 mil instead of $2 mil), with increases to $6 mil in 2025 and $8 mil in 2026, $10 mil in 2027, and $12 mil in 2028.   To date, Contreras hasn't earned much in his career; a $250,000 signing bonus in 2016, minor league salaries for the next 4+ years, and this year was his first major league salary.  Contreras could be a bust or could be injured, but he appears to be talented and having a moderate cost rotation for future teams could be a real asset.

2)  The team should avoid wasting money on crap.  The Pirates now have enough middling talent in their minor league system that they don't need to take flyers on marginal major league players who are more expensive, or who have no future with the team.  Although I supported his signing last year, avoid going for Tsutugo or the like who cost $4 mil, or players who are too one dimensional such as Vogelbach.  And, if Roberto Perez wants to come back to the Pirates, it should be on a contract that is less than $5 mil.   Tsutugo and Perez produced very little for the $9 mil in commitment, and the best thing about signing Vogelbach could be Holderman, if he returns to health.   Also, no more players along the lines of VanMeter, Allen, or Collins, even though their issue was talent and not salary cost.

3)  Quintana turned out to be a great signing last year.  He pitched well in Pittsburgh, he was inexpensive, and his trade helped to acquire  talent that may help in the longer term.  In quickly scanning the list of free agent pitchers, there may not be another Quintana among them; particularly someone who would sign for a paltry $2 mil.   On the inexpensive side, perhaps Zach Davies would be an option.   Michael Lorenzen, who was hurt (shoulder) for part of the year, could be a mid-range option (he earned $6.75 mil for the Angels last year.  I believe it would be wise to add another starting pitcher from outside the organization; someone who like Quintana could be traded at the deadline if the team again flounders in 2023, or if the team starts to turn it around, who could remain on the roster for the season .

4)  The Pirates bullpen wavered between acceptable, at times, and downright abysmal for too much of the year.  If Holderman and DeLosSantos are healthy, perhaps the team has 2 folks who could pitch meaningful innings.  Bednar clearly has value, but perhaps would have more value as a trade piece than keeping him.  I am particularly concerned with his control after his injury.   If he lacks control, his value to the Pirates as a dependable 'outs' pitcher really sinks.  Crowe, DeJong, Ramirez,  Banuelos, and even Stephenson demonstrated some ability from time to time.   All in all, a rather fungible group.   I would like BC to focus on acquiring pitchers who could go more than 1 inning.  Wilson could be an internal option, and could have more value as a reliever than as a potential starter.

5)  With respect to first base, I don't want the team to pursue a player like Hosmer (who I doubt would waive his no trade clause to come to Pittsburgh), Aguilar, or the like.  While I continue to believe that Cruz should be an option, I would be content with giving him the first 3 months of next season at short to see if his concentration and dependability improves.  I also believe that next year's ban on 'radical' shifts may help him to adjust, along with convincing him that he doesn't need to believe he can catch any fly ball short of the outfield fence and to rely more on his outfielders.   So, I would give Andujar a shot at first, and I would tell him now that this is the team's plan.  I would also start working with Mitchell at first.  A Mitchell/Andujar platoon could be an option to see if either can adjust to major league pitching.  Within the next year, I believe either Davis or Rodriguez could be real options at first.

6)  With so little money to bring in any significant talent from outside of the organization, the Bucs are largely going to need to focus on bringing out every ounce of talent that they can from the young players on the current roster.  They, like all teams, will need to consider how the end to radical shifting (no more 2nd baseman playing mid-right field) will create more opportunities for getting men on base, and to help their hitters adjust to a change in their approach to hitting.   Even though he has little power,  Bae may be their best option for LF .
They need to hope that Oviedo and Ortiz, along with Contreras and Keller, can continue to grow, and that Brubaker can regularly take the ball every 5th day and pitch to an ERA around 4.  Also, with a regular spring training, they need to have their starters being ready to go 5+ at the start of the season.

Oh well, it is still October.  Like all year's, anxious to see how the off-season unfolds.  I hope it involves more than yesterday's dumpster diving for Sulser and Sanchez, and moving on from Godoy, but in most likelihood, that is what we will see.   

Note to BC - Please ask your analytics department to prepare a montage of all the times that Rabelo waived a player home that he was thrown out vs when he waived a player home (in a tight situation) in which the player scored.  Rabelo is a lousy 3rd base coach.  He must go.       
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Surgnbuck
Elite Member
*****
Offline


OnlyBucs.net Member

Posts: 7699
Location: Lower Burrell PA
Joined: Mar 4th, 2020
Re: Offseason Outlook: Pittsburgh Pirates (MLBTR)
Reply #38 - Oct 19th, 2022 at 5:55pm
Print Post  
Love reading your thoughts Maine Bucs. One thing you mentioned, regarding shifts and how that might improve the offense. It's going to do the same for the other team too, at least as MLB's vision holds. So we might see some progression with the batters, but the pitchers may see a big fall back.
  

"Service to others is the rent you pay for your time here on earth."  Muhammed Ali
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
WildwoodDave 2
Elite Member
*****
Offline


OnlyBucs.net Member

Posts: 3828
Joined: Dec 17th, 2020
Re: Offseason Outlook: Pittsburgh Pirates (MLBTR)
Reply #39 - Oct 20th, 2022 at 7:58am
Print Post  
Surgnbuck wrote on Oct 19th, 2022 at 5:55pm:
Love reading your thoughts Maine Bucs. One thing you mentioned, regarding shifts and how that might improve the offense. It's going to do the same for the other team too, at least as MLB's vision holds. So we might see some progression with the batters, but the pitchers may see a big fall back.

I enjoyed reading your comments as well. When you mentioned you will remain a Pirate fan it brought to mind when someone asked me who I rooted for he said, " oh I'm sorry, your owner is
a complete A$$hole"
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
SyrBucco
Senior Member
****
Offline


OnlyBucs.net Member

Posts: 497
Joined: Jun 30th, 2016
Re: Offseason Outlook: Pittsburgh Pirates (MLBTR)
Reply #40 - Oct 20th, 2022 at 10:43am
Print Post  
Mainer, thanks for a great post! Agree with most of it. A couple of thoughts:
What we could sorely use is a LHSP. We have plenty of RHSP. I would happily invite Tyler Anderson or Jose Oquendo back to Pittsburgh if either would accept a reasonable 2-year deal. More likely, we could take a chance on a bounce-back year from the likes of Matthew Boyd.
Agree that Roberto Perez should be brought back, and at a discount from last year's 5 mil.
Also like your idea of finding a 1Bman from existing resources. Yes, Mitchell and Andujar are good candidates, but I would also try out Rudolfo Castro and give Sabol a spin there.
What you are so very right about is that WE SHOULD NOT sign mediocre position players because our roster is bursting at the seams with young players who need at bats!
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Doc
Elite Member
*****
Offline


OnlyBucs.net Member

Posts: 3490
Location: Pittsburgh
Joined: May 20th, 2018
Re: Offseason Outlook: Pittsburgh Pirates (MLBTR)
Reply #41 - Oct 20th, 2022 at 12:29pm
Print Post  
Mainer, so many good thoughts.  Like you, I agree it’s time to move on from the veteran guys (VanMeter, et al) who’ve never been good players and have no future with the team.  There are now enough young players to fill those roles.  However, I would like to have a veteran starting pitcher, like Quintana, who can both mentor the young guys and be used as a trade chip next July.  I do think the team will be a bit more competitive in ‘23, but won’t be a contender, so trading that pitcher shouldn’t arouse anger.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
WildwoodDave 2
Elite Member
*****
Offline


OnlyBucs.net Member

Posts: 3828
Joined: Dec 17th, 2020
Re: Offseason Outlook: Pittsburgh Pirates (MLBTR)
Reply #42 - Oct 22nd, 2022 at 7:38am
Print Post  
Doc wrote on Oct 20th, 2022 at 12:29pm:
Mainer, so many good thoughts.  Like you, I agree it’s time to move on from the veteran guys (VanMeter, et al) who’ve never been good players and have no future with the team.  There are now enough young players to fill those roles.  However, I would like to have a veteran starting pitcher, like Quintana, who can both mentor the young guys and be used as a trade chip next July.  I do think the team will be a bit more competitive in ‘23, but won’t be a contender, so trading that pitcher shouldn’t arouse anger.

Maybe you can find some pitching prospects out there in Arizona in the 60 and older league  Cheesy
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Ecbucs
Elite Member
*****
Offline


OnlyBucs.net Member

Posts: 3913
Location: Alabama
Joined: Jun 30th, 2016
Re: Offseason Outlook: Pittsburgh Pirates (MLBTR)
Reply #43 - Oct 22nd, 2022 at 7:54am
Print Post  
MaineBucs wrote on Oct 19th, 2022 at 2:31pm:
Disgustingly, it appears that BC will again need to try and field a team with a payroll in the range of $55 mil, or about $35 mil less than when the team last made the play-offs, and this at a time when many major league payrolls and individual player salaries are surging.  I loath Nutting and his business model that knee caps the Pirates and ruins the dreams of life-long and young Pirate fans alike.   That said, I have chosen to remain a Pirate fan.  Recognizing the severe salary constraints confronting BC, I offer my thoughts on how he could allocate his limited resources in making improvements in 2023 and helping to jump start the team to further advancements (more wins) in 2024. 

First, some positives:

1) The Pirates (for the first time in a while as the Polanco contract is now off the books) have no bad long-term contracts.  Only Hayes and Reynolds are signed for next year, and Hayes is the only player signed beyond next season.  And, while Hayes' contract checks in at $10 mil next year, it is only $7 - $8 mil for the next 6 seasons.  At present, the Pirates have a total of $16.75 mil committed to next year's payroll between Hayes and Reynolds.

2) The Pirates are not facing any significant arbitration cases with respect to total salary.  Only 6 players are eligible for arbitration (Stephenson, Newman, Andujar, Underwood, Keller, and Brubaker), and the highest estimated arbitration salary is Newman at $2.8 mil.  And, as noted in the MLB Trade Rumors article, several of the above could be released, although releasing any of the above would not do a lot to boost available payroll to commit to other players.  As such, players that are released can be based on value to the team (read talent) rather than cost.  Few other teams are in a similar position.   

3)  Most players on the team are not eligible for arbitration as they have less than 3 years of service, thus they will earn between the league minimum and $800,000.  This likely will be the case for at least 12 and more likely up to 18 players on the team.  This likely will result in a total payroll commitment of about $18 mil.    

So, some moves I would pursue.

1)  Although it is not adding to the current roster, I believe the Bucs should offer 2 long-term contracts to current pitchers:

a) Based on this season's performance, I would offer Keller a 5 year deal to buy out his 3 years of arbitration eligibility and his first 2 years of free agency.  As he is scheduled to earn about $2.8 mil in arbitration, perhaps a 2023 boost to $4.5 mil, a 2024 salary in the range of $6.5 mil, a 2025 salary in the range of $8 mil, and 2 free agent years in the range of $10 or $12 mil could interest him.  The cost of talent is escalating rapidly, and if Keller is now the real deal (as he appears to be), now is the time to commit to him.   Keller is still only 26 years old.

b) The second pitcher would be Contreras.  As Surg noted, the Braves inked Strider to a 6 year - $75 million deal.  Contreras did not have anywhere near Strider's stats, but he has shown promise.  Strider's deal pays him little in the next 2 seasons $1 mil each year), increasing to $4 mil in 2025, but then jumps dramatically to $20 and $22 mil in its last 2 years.   I would suggest that the Bucs approach Contreras with a front-loaded deal.  Offer him 6 years with an option and pay him something like $45 - $50 mil over the life of the deal.  Perhaps $5 mil in 2023 and 2024 (meaning he would earn about $10 mil instead of $2 mil), with increases to $6 mil in 2025 and $8 mil in 2026, $10 mil in 2027, and $12 mil in 2028.   To date, Contreras hasn't earned much in his career; a $250,000 signing bonus in 2016, minor league salaries for the next 4+ years, and this year was his first major league salary.  Contreras could be a bust or could be injured, but he appears to be talented and having a moderate cost rotation for future teams could be a real asset.

2)  The team should avoid wasting money on crap.  The Pirates now have enough middling talent in their minor league system that they don't need to take flyers on marginal major league players who are more expensive, or who have no future with the team.  Although I supported his signing last year, avoid going for Tsutugo or the like who cost $4 mil, or players who are too one dimensional such as Vogelbach.  And, if Roberto Perez wants to come back to the Pirates, it should be on a contract that is less than $5 mil.   Tsutugo and Perez produced very little for the $9 mil in commitment, and the best thing about signing Vogelbach could be Holderman, if he returns to health.   Also, no more players along the lines of VanMeter, Allen, or Collins, even though their issue was talent and not salary cost.

3)  Quintana turned out to be a great signing last year.  He pitched well in Pittsburgh, he was inexpensive, and his trade helped to acquire  talent that may help in the longer term.  In quickly scanning the list of free agent pitchers, there may not be another Quintana among them; particularly someone who would sign for a paltry $2 mil.   On the inexpensive side, perhaps Zach Davies would be an option.   Michael Lorenzen, who was hurt (shoulder) for part of the year, could be a mid-range option (he earned $6.75 mil for the Angels last year.  I believe it would be wise to add another starting pitcher from outside the organization; someone who like Quintana could be traded at the deadline if the team again flounders in 2023, or if the team starts to turn it around, who could remain on the roster for the season .

4)  The Pirates bullpen wavered between acceptable, at times, and downright abysmal for too much of the year.  If Holderman and DeLosSantos are healthy, perhaps the team has 2 folks who could pitch meaningful innings.  Bednar clearly has value, but perhaps would have more value as a trade piece than keeping him.  I am particularly concerned with his control after his injury.   If he lacks control, his value to the Pirates as a dependable 'outs' pitcher really sinks.  Crowe, DeJong, Ramirez,  Banuelos, and even Stephenson demonstrated some ability from time to time.   All in all, a rather fungible group.   I would like BC to focus on acquiring pitchers who could go more than 1 inning.  Wilson could be an internal option, and could have more value as a reliever than as a potential starter.

5)  With respect to first base, I don't want the team to pursue a player like Hosmer (who I doubt would waive his no trade clause to come to Pittsburgh), Aguilar, or the like.  While I continue to believe that Cruz should be an option, I would be content with giving him the first 3 months of next season at short to see if his concentration and dependability improves.  I also believe that next year's ban on 'radical' shifts may help him to adjust, along with convincing him that he doesn't need to believe he can catch any fly ball short of the outfield fence and to rely more on his outfielders.   So, I would give Andujar a shot at first, and I would tell him now that this is the team's plan.  I would also start working with Mitchell at first.  A Mitchell/Andujar platoon could be an option to see if either can adjust to major league pitching.  Within the next year, I believe either Davis or Rodriguez could be real options at first.

6)  With so little money to bring in any significant talent from outside of the organization, the Bucs are largely going to need to focus on bringing out every ounce of talent that they can from the young players on the current roster.  They, like all teams, will need to consider how the end to radical shifting (no more 2nd baseman playing mid-right field) will create more opportunities for getting men on base, and to help their hitters adjust to a change in their approach to hitting.   Even though he has little power,  Bae may be their best option for LF .
They need to hope that Oviedo and Ortiz, along with Contreras and Keller, can continue to grow, and that Brubaker can regularly take the ball every 5th day and pitch to an ERA around 4.  Also, with a regular spring training, they need to have their starters being ready to go 5+ at the start of the season.

Oh well, it is still October.  Like all year's, anxious to see how the off-season unfolds.  I hope it involves more than yesterday's dumpster diving for Sulser and Sanchez, and moving on from Godoy, but in most likelihood, that is what we will see.   

Note to BC - Please ask your analytics department to prepare a montage of all the times that Rabelo waived a player home that he was thrown out vs when he waived a player home (in a tight situation) in which the player scored.  Rabelo is a lousy 3rd base coach.  He must go.       


Good post.  I just don't understand the attitude from ownership reflected by Ben that we have all the time in the world for our process to work.  Other teams are working to improve too.

Its like the other teams are running a 100-yard dash and the Bucs are running a 220.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Doc
Elite Member
*****
Offline


OnlyBucs.net Member

Posts: 3490
Location: Pittsburgh
Joined: May 20th, 2018
Re: Offseason Outlook: Pittsburgh Pirates (MLBTR)
Reply #44 - Oct 22nd, 2022 at 9:15am
Print Post  
WildwoodDave 2 wrote on Oct 22nd, 2022 at 7:38am:
Doc wrote on Oct 20th, 2022 at 12:29pm:
Mainer, so many good thoughts.  Like you, I agree it’s time to move on from the veteran guys (VanMeter, et al) who’ve never been good players and have no future with the team.  There are now enough young players to fill those roles.  However, I would like to have a veteran starting pitcher, like Quintana, who can both mentor the young guys and be used as a trade chip next July.  I do think the team will be a bit more competitive in ‘23, but won’t be a contender, so trading that pitcher shouldn’t arouse anger.

Maybe you can find some pitching prospects out there in Arizona in the 60 and older league  Cheesy


The ultimate dumpster dive.
  
Back to top
 
IP Logged
 
Page Index Toggle Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 8
Send TopicPrint